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PostPosted: Fri Jul 29, 2016 6:42 am 
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Joined: Thu Jul 28, 2016 8:30 pm
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Hello, I am new to the world of classic AEC's, well just trucks in general.
I have always had a love for them and much prefer looking at them at shoes than classic cars.
Currently I am considering buying an AEC Matador as I have loved these since a child epically as my grandfather drove them in Africa during the war.
So my questions are What's ownership and getting parts like? Are they good for a first time project?
What should I look out for when buying one?
I have restored cars in the past but now would like a change.

Regards
Scott


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 02, 2016 2:44 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2012 10:24 pm
Posts: 108
Before you even think about buying you need to find secure longterm under cover storage at a rate that you can afford.This will need to have a concrete floor, mains electricity and enough headroom to be able to raise thevehicle enough for some of the necessary work needed. You need to be able toworkonit safely, which meanslorry sized toolsand equipment, which are expensive. Above all you need to appreciate that it weighs many times more thana car or vanand is easily capable1 of killing a complete bus queue if you don't understand how systems work.

that sorted then you will need woodworking skills as well as the sheet metal work skills thaatyou probably already have fo e small vehicle restorztion.

sorry tablet rather than umputer.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2016 9:18 am 
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Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2012 12:51 pm
Posts: 11
enthusiasm is the only thing you need, everything else can be found, brought or made. I purchased mine at 18 and it took 10 years to restore, it was very rough. Never give up, listen to good advice and you'll find away of getting round not having everything you need.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2016 4:02 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jan 24, 2012 4:44 pm
Posts: 169
If you join a NARTM affiliated museum then you can get the expertise, the storage and the help all in one:
http://www.nartm.org.uk/


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2016 8:45 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2015 6:39 pm
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Firstly welcome to the world of aec .A matador is a brilliant choice,parts are readily available as is experienced knowledge.Your interest in mats due to family ties is similar to my own
Without people like yourself old Aec,s will eventually be of No intrest to the human race,sadly every year many people with Aec experience die,I can name 2 in my own village in the last six months,so contary to certain negative advice ,if your intrested buy one,i did ,I am not a mechanic ,carpenter or sheet metal worker neither did I have a workshop, just some great friends who let me park it in the mothers garden where I managed to restore a wreck back to a fully operational matador timber crane.
You learn as you go ,especially as you already have car experience. My reply to those who are always concerned for your wellbeing,is what would have happened to those guys in the film Flight of the Phoenix if they had not tried to build a plane to escape the desert ?
Good luck,you can always use this forum for help there are many helpful people,in years to come your own experience will be of help to someone,guaranteed.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2016 7:51 am 
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Joined: Thu May 31, 2012 4:03 pm
Posts: 32
Go ahead and do it Chap. Its ridiculous to suggest you need a workshop and full skills, but I guess some people have become a little soft.

I purchased my Mat in a very derelict state in 1998. No sides in the cab, fuel tank, wiring loom, engine covers, floor in the cab, windscreens and mudguards. The chassis had been cropped down, the engine was miss timed, the crank had a worn out journal and an elongated conrod at the big end. The block was cracked, as was the crankcase. The brakes were overthrown.

No I did not have any undercover workshop, and I had no wood working skills. I was a Motor Mech though. What I did have was enthusiasm.

So I reckon you should have a go.

Don't forget on cold days when driving it to take a little rug to keep your knees warm.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2016 3:40 pm 
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Joined: Mon May 07, 2012 4:18 pm
Posts: 20
Go for it. The Matador is a brilliant piece of kit. I have had mine for over 15 years and I am still restoring it. They are uncomplicated and very robust, there are lots of them still about and there are people who are usually very willing to help. If you look on the internet there are pictures and articles of people restoring them. I don't have a workshop to fit it in, most of the large parts are restored in the open.
As Mattyboy says you need enthusiasm more than anything else.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 29, 2016 10:23 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2012 10:24 pm
Posts: 108
Tragically a greatly respected, admired and knowledgeable long-time heavy vehicle enthusiast and owner, who had spent his life in the industry, was killed recently when working on one of his vehicles while carrying out a routine, almost everyday job.

Enthusiasm is not enough. A little knowledge can be a dangerous thing. There is a well known saying in the aviation industry: "There are old pilots and there are bold pilots, but there are no old, bold pilots."

Yes a Matador is a good project for restoration, but know what you are getting into - it is not just a bigger car.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 09, 2016 8:51 pm 
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Joined: Sun May 08, 2016 8:11 pm
Posts: 22
Location: Dagenham, Essex, UK
Best to say anything bigger than a car requires the application of common sense. The original poster has shown a degree of that by asking the question he did first, rather than blindly plunging in. The tools, jack etc all need to be of a size commensurate with the vehicle. My Militant weighs in at approx 10 tons unladen - so the jack I bought is a 20 ton one.
Remember this - and when moving heavy objects like brakes, gearboxes, engines etc do it with 2 people and make sure the parts are supported.


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